350+ Most Terrifying Japanese Demon Names With Meanings

For centuries, the culture and mythology of Japan have fascinated people worldwide. One of the most intriguing aspects of Japanese folklore is the existence of demons, often referred to as “Yokai” or “Oni.” These supernatural creatures are a significant part of Japanese culture and have been known to possess different levels of power and malevolence. Their names, often inspired by nature and traditional Japanese beliefs, hold profound significance and are often used to describe the characteristics of the demon. In this blog, we will explore the fascinating world of Japanese demon names and delve deeper into the meanings behind each name. Get ready to discover the intricacies of Japanese demon culture with us!

In Japanese folklore, demons play a significant role. They are known to possess supernatural powers and are often depicted as formidable creatures that bring misfortune to those they encounter.

Despite their ominous reputation, Japanese demon names have always fascinated people, both in Japan and across the world. Not only are these names unique and spellbinding, but they also hold deep cultural and historical significance.

Japanese Demon Names

Welcome to the world of Japanese demon names! The rich and diverse mythology of Japanese demons has been a source of fascination for many who seek to learn more about this fascinating culture.

  • Nyūnaisuzume—”Crying Lady Sparrow” is one of the most appealing Japanese demon names. This demon is known for vengeance and betrayal. Nyūnaisuzume, a lovely Japanese mythical heroine, was harmed by her lover. She became a sparrow and haunted her ex-lover, crying out in agony.
  • Tsuchigumo—The “Earth Spider” is another famous Japanese demon name. This spider-like demon has a long white beard and a human face. Tsuchigumo can manipulate animals and humans in certain myths. In others, it preys on unsuspecting passengers. Tsuchigumo can disguise itself as a human or animal to trick or attack people.
  • Kuchisake-Onna—The “Slit-mouthed Woman” is a famous Japanese demon. The spirit of a horribly slain woman with her mouth slit from ear to ear is claimed to haunt it. Kuchisake-Onna is a vindictive ghost who haunts unfaithful or violent husbands in certain legends. In others, she is a more innocent figure who stalks the streets, asking others if she is beautiful before revealing her horrible deformities.
  • Nuribotoke—”Painted Buddha” is another intriguing Japanese demon. A devil inhabits a statue or picture. The demon may sometimes make the object it possesses move and speak. Nuribotoke is a frightening supernatural force.
  • Kitsune no Yomiuri—Japanese mythology’s “Fox wedding” is unique. In Japanese tradition, magical foxes sometimes marry in human form. Foxes, famed for their cunning, may do this to deceive people. Kitsune no yomeiri shows how Japanese mythology mixes the supernatural and natural.
  • Kamaitachi—the “sickle weasel” demon—attacks humans with its sharp claws. Wind-related Kamaitachi can move faster than the eye can see. Woodblock prints and scroll paintings employ its image.
  • Jorōgumo—The “prostitute spider” demon is a spider woman. Its beauty lures unsuspecting men to their deaths. Jorōgumo symbolizes deception and seduction, and its stories warn against believing appearances.
  • Nozuchi—The “field snake” demon Nozuchi resides in fields and meadows. It brings poor luck and crop failures. Nozuchi is characterized as a dangerous beast.
  • Uma-no-ashi—The “horse’s foot” demon. A demonic horse that terrorizes the countryside is thought to have abandoned it. Uma-no-ashi is a sign of evil.
  • Taka-onna—The “tall woman” demon is a gorgeous woman with extremely long legs. It lures men to their deaths with food and sex. Taka-onna is portrayed as alluring but lethal.
  • Hone-onna—The ghostly “bone woman” is a lovely woman with exposed bones. It symbolizes beauty’s transience and mortality. Hone-Onna represents death in Japanese mythology.
  • Aobōzu—The “blue monk” demon is a bald-headed monk in blue robes. It is thought to be a mischievous ghost. Aobōzu is a trickster who enjoys chaos and uncertainty.
  • Kudan—A human-cow hybrid, Kudan. It has a human head and cow body and can speak. Kudan is thought to foretell disasters and wars.
  • Binbōgami—The “poverty god” is a demon of misfortune and poverty. It is pictured as a ragged, destitute elderly guy who brings bad luck. In Japanese culture, binbōgami symbolizes hardship.
  • Daitengu—The “great heaven dog” is a muscular, red-faced demon with a long nose. Wind, lightning, and thunder powers are attributed to it. Daitengu protects mountains and forests.
  • Kokakuchō—The “cuckoo bird” demon brings death and misfortune. It hovers above the sick and aged and is supposed to be able to anticipate death. Japanese legend calls Kokakuchō intriguing and scary.
  • Kahaku —A river and lake demon. It is a lovely woman with long hair that lures men to their deaths. Kahaku symbolizes water’s perils and nature’s unpredictability.
  • Ittan-momen—A long-clothed demon. It suffocates travelers by wrapping around their faces. Ittan-Momen seeks revenge on wrongdoers.
  • Akaname—the “filth licker” demon—is associated with hygiene. It looks like a little goblin with a long tongue that cleans unclean surfaces. Japanese folklore promotes hygiene with akaname.
  • Furutsubaki-no-rei—An old camellia tree monster. It is thought to curse tree cutters. Furutsubaki-no-rei guards nature.
  • Ōgama
  • Mizuchi
  • Tamamo-no-Mae
  • Ameonna
  • Jinmenju
  • Tengu
  • Biwa-bokuboku
  • Ōkubi
  • Arikura-no-baba
  • Komainu
  • Kyonshii
  • Umi-nyōbō
  • Agubanba
  • Sarakazoe
  • Baku
  • Akkorokamui
  • Miage-nyūdō
  • Amanozako
  • Kanedama
  • Onmoraki
  • Yōkai
  • Yamaoroshi
  • Enenra
  • Yamajijii
  • Amaterasu
  • Hitodama
  • Te-no-me
  • Hakanohi
  • Janjanbi
  • Kappa
  • Kyōkotsu
  • Yadōkai
  • Kosode-no-te
  • Shiranui
  • Nikujin
  • Nure-onna
  • Kambarinyūdō
  • Kasa-obake
  • Kasha
  • Rokurokubi
  • Hanako-san

Nuppeppo

Evil Japanese Demon Names

Demons in Japanese mythology are complex and fearsome. These monsters enjoy wreaking havoc. Despite their evil reputations, these demons have captivated many and made it into popular culture. This blog explores Japanese demon names and their connotations. We’ll explore their stories and names’ meaning. We want to explore this fascinating issue and understand these scary animals.

  • Ōmukade—A human-faced centipede monster. It can tunnel through rock and is earth-related. In Japanese mythology, Ōmukade symbolizes natural perils.
  • Kameosa—A turtle-related monster that inhabits dead turtle shells. In Japanese folklore, it controls live turtles’ unexpected movements. Japanese mythology’s Kameosa is mysterious.
  • Shinigami—The “death god” is a monster. It is represented as a skeletal figure with a sickle and is supposed to transport the dead to the afterlife. Japanese mythology depicts shinigami as grim reapers.
  • Namazu—An earthquake-causing monster. It thrashes like a big catfish in underground rivers, shaking the ground above. Japanese mythology personifies natural disasters like Namazu.
  • Yōsei—Japanese mythology uses “fairy” demons to represent nature spirits. It is usually a little, flying creature like a fairy. Yōsei shows nature’s beauty and force.
  • Teratsutsuki—A mountain demon responsible for landslides and rockfalls. A big, shaggy beast with long horns, it looks dangerous. Teratsutsuki depicts how the Japanese regard nature as powerful and dangerous.
  • Yama-uba—The “mountain witch” Yama-Uba is a Japanese demon linked with mountains and woods. She is a wild-haired, crooked-nosed old woman who kidnaps and eats children. Yama-uba symbolizes the unknown.
  • Kijimuna—A forest demon. It is a little, mischievous creature with a long nose and sharp ears. Compared to other demons, Kijimuna is a light-hearted creature in Japanese mythology who explains weird forest events.
  • Hitotsume-kozō—A temple and shrine monster. It is a little, one-eyed monster that causes trouble. Hitotsume-kozō shows that even hallowed sites have malicious spirits.
  • Bake-kujira—The “ghost whale” is a sea demon. A gigantic, ghostly whale shines in the dark. Bake-kujira symbolizes the sea and otherworldly threats in Japanese folklore.
  • Ningyo—The “mermaid” demon Ningyo is attractive and associated with the sea. It is said to grant desires, but sighting one brings misfortune. Ningyo symbolizes the sea’s unpredictability.
  • Kawaakago—A river monster with horse legs, Kawaakago is a woman. It can cause whirlpools and drown people. Kawaakago warns about drowning.
  • Yamako—Yashima no Hage-tanuki—Japanese folklore’s famed raccoon dog. It is a trickster and shapeshifter. Yashima no Hage-tanuki warns against dishonesty and manipulation.
  • Kuchisake-onna—The “slit-mouthed woman” monster scares children into good behavior. A woman with an ear-to-ear slit mouth represents it. Kuchisake-onna cautions against trusting strangers.
  • Kubikajiri—Decapitation monster. It appears as a floating head that tries to bite people’s heads. Kubikajiri reminds us of Japanese devils’ brutality.
  • Tanuki—Raccoon dogs are popular Japanese demons. They are generally portrayed as shape-shifting pranksters. Tanuki reminds us to laugh and play.
  • Mikaribaba—A delivery demon, Mikaribaba causes miscarriages and stillbirths. It’s a tangled-haired old woman with wild eyes. Mikaribaba warns traditional Japanese women of pregnancy and delivery risks.
  • Morinji-no-kama—A Japanese tea ceremony demon. It is a warrior with a kettle on its back that causes tea ceremony errors. Morinji-no-kama emphasizes mindfulness and intricacy in traditional Japanese tea ceremonies.
  • Jibakurei—An earthquake and natural catastrophe demon. The ghosts of earthquake victims seek revenge. Jibakurei reminds us of natural calamities’ devastation.
  • Karasu-tengu—A mountain-and-forest monster. It is a bird-man with wings and talons and a skilled fighter. Karasu-tengu symbolizes nature’s force and the need to be prepared for wilderness danger.
  • Myōbu
  • Hitotsume-nyūdō
  • Isonade
  • Shidaidaka
  • Zashiki-warashi
  • Kotobuki
  • Kunekune
  • Suzuri-no-tamashii
  • Hiderigami
  • Amefurikozō
  • Hihi
  • Namahage
  • Ikiryō
  • Shisa
  • Dōnotsura
  • Yomotsu-shikome
  • Kumo Yōkai
  • Onikuma
  • Noderabō
  • Hiyoribō
  • Kirin
  • Enkō
  • Zuijin
  • Amorōnagu
  • Haradashi
  • Onihitokuchi
  • Hakutaku
  • Oboroguruma
  • Sōjōbō
  • Karura
  • Inugami
  • Jubokko
  • Sa Gojō
  • Kuda-gitsune
  • Jikininki
  • Kyōrinrin
  • Keneō
  • Ungaikyō
  • Samebito
  • Kechibi

Aobōzu

Japanese Demon Names from Folklore

Demons represent fear, terror, and evil in Japanese folklore. These mythological creatures have many names and shapes. Each demon’s story, demeanor, and purpose represent Japanese culture. This blog explores Japanese demon name legends. Join me in exploring Japanese demon names, from evil spirits to mischievous yokai.

  • Raijū—Thunder and lightning demon. It resembles a little fox with blazing eyes and a loud growl. Raijū reminds us to appreciate nature’s devastating power.
  • Yamako—A mountain demon that causes rockfalls and landslides. It is a fierce-looking woman with wild hair. Yamako reminds us of the dangers of living near natural forces and the significance of disaster preparedness.
  • Jinmenken—Jinmenken is a demon with a human face and a dog body. It allegedly stalks the streets at night, frightening passersby. Jinmenken warns against nighttime wandering.
  • Basan—A fire demon. It causes drought and flames like a chicken with a fiery tail. Basan emphasizes nature respect and fire prevention.
  • Shachihoko—A dragon-headed fish monster. It protects structures from fire and flooding. Shachihoko emphasizes asset protection and guardianship.
  • Suzaku—Suzaku is a southern demon represented as a red bird. Seeing it is thought to bring luck and fortune. Suzaku emphasizes positive energy and luck.
  • Sankai—A sea demon that causes shipwrecks and drownings. The enormous sea turtle has a human face. Sankai warns seafarers of the ocean’s hazards.
  • Hyōsube—A snow and cold-weather demon. It is a little, cold monster that causes frostbite and hypothermia. Hyōsube reminds us to dress warmly in winter.
  • Ushi no toki mairi—A haunted-place demon. It is claimed to appear at night to those who execute a ritual at certain spots and deliver calamity. Ushi no toki mairi warns about investigating uncharted places.
  • Aoandon—A terrible monster that brings disaster and despair. Usually represented as a kimono-clad woman carrying a lantern. Abandon reminds us to find hope in dark times.
  • Nyūdō-bōzu—a huge monk with a bald head and a nasty nature—is a demon. It terrorizes tourists at night and symbolizes the risks of walking alone.
  • Byōbunozoki—A voyeuristic monster. It’s generally pictured as a nighttime creature who peeks inside windows. Byōbunozoki emphasizes privacy and boundary respect.
  • Tsurube-otoshi—A well-bucket-hanging demon. It is claimed to drop on unsuspecting victims and drag them into the well. Tsurube-otoshi reminds people to keep alert and avoid cramped spaces.
  • Abura-akago—This monster steals oil from lanterns and lamps. It looks like an oil-covered infant. Abura-akago emphasizes resource conservation and oil efficiency.
  • Nukekubi—Decapitation-related demon. It is a human whose head detaches and flies at night. Nukekubi emphasizes the risks of violence and the need for nonviolent conflict settlement.
  • Aonyōbō—Aonyōbō is a female lantern-carrying demon. It appears at night and chases individuals, seeking the location of her lost child. Aonyōbō reminds us to be kind to the bereaved.
  • Rōjinbi—A wrinkled old man demon linked with old age. It often preys on the elderly. Rōjinbi emphasizes elder reverence and protection.
  • Ōmagatoki—This twilight demon appears at dusk and dawn. It often appears as a ghostly figure haunting the day-to-night changeover. Ōmagatoki emphasizes transitions and change.
  • Seiryū—A blue dragon demon from the east, Seiryū. It’s thought to bring luck and wealth. Seiryū reminds us to maintain balance and positive energy.
  • Osakabehime—A mermaid-like sea demon. It brings sailors and fisherman luck. Osakabehime reminds us to work hard to succeed.
  • Amaburakosagi
  • Nekomata
  • Amamehagi
  • Satori
  • Yato-no-kami
  • Ōkami
  • Shirōneri
  • Son Gokū
  • Waira
  • Tennin
  • Hoshi no Tama
  • Ningen
  • Hibagon
  • Okiku
  • Hashihime
  • Bakeneko
  • Onibaba
  • Noppera-bō
  • Tenko
  • Nurikabe
  • Bashōnosei
  • Nobusuma
  • Issie
  • Jatai
  • Fūri
  • Goryō
  • Mujina
  • Kitsunebi
  • Aosaginohi
  • Shirime
  • Byakko
  • Iyaya
  • Mokumokuren
  • Azukiarai/Azukitogi
  • Tenjōkudari
  • Furaribi
  • Tsukumogami
  • Amikiri
  • Inugami Gyoubu
  • Okuri-inu

Cool Japanese Demon Names

Japanese mythology and folklore are full of supernatural beings with unique qualities and skills. Japanese devils have long been feared and adored. The names of these monsters, rich in symbolism, have captivated many. This blog will examine some of these cool Japanese demon names and their origins, examining their meaning and legends. Explore Japanese demons and their names with us.

  • Ashimagari—Ashimagari, a sleeping monster, causes nightmares and sleep paralysis. The creature sits on people’s chests while they sleep. Ashimagari emphasizes restful sleep and good sleep practices.
  • Tsukinowaguma—This forest-dwelling monster is related to trees and looks like a big bear. It controls woodland animals and trees. Tsukinowaguma reminds us to protect nature and forests.
  • Yobuko—Gashadokuro—A death monster, Gashadokuro is a huge skeleton constructed of starved or battle-killed people. It often seeks vengeance for its premature death. Gashadokuro reminds us to appreciate life.
  • Tsuchinoko—A snake demon with a beer belly, crooked tail, and little legs. Catching it brings luck. Tsuchinoko emphasizes the value of positivism and levity.
  • Yonakinoishi—A nighttime haunting voice, Yonakinoishi is a sound demon. It whispers profanity and nonsense at passersby. Yonakinoishi reminds us to follow our instincts and inner voice.
  • Shishi—The lion-like demon Shishi protects. It guards Japanese shrines and important sites. Shishi reminds us to fight for our values.
  • Akabeko—Akabeko is a red cow demon linked with livestock. Respecting it is considered to heal and bring luck. Akabeko reminds us to respect nature and animals.
  • Wanyūdō—Wanyūdō is a demon with a fiery cartwheel head. Hell’s soul carrier. Wanyūdō emphasizes equilibrium and the cycle of life.
  • Wani—Wani is a water demon represented as a sea monster or crocodile. Disrespecting it can bring misfortune. Wani emphasizes reverence for nature and the elements.
  • Ubume—Ubume is a motherhood-related demon. It haunts childbirth-dead mothers. Ubume reminds us to recognize mothers and their family sacrifices.
  • Itsumade—A monster crow with human traits, Itsumade is a bird demon. It often preys on humans and animals. Itsumade emphasizes the importance of wildlife conservation and ecosystem balance.
  • Yobuko—A water demon that calls out from under bridges at night. The mischievous spirit pulls people into the water. Yobuko reminds us to stay alert and watch out for danger.
  • Ushi-oni—Ushi-oni is a horned ox-headed demon. It can cause drought and hunger. Ushi-oni reminds us to respect nature and its impact on our lives.
  • Gyūki—Gyūki, a sea creature with an ox head, is a water demon. It often terrorizes fishermen and seafarers. Gyūki emphasizes the ocean’s power and hazards.
  • Mikoshi— A giant carrying a mikoshi, a portable Shinto shrine, Mikoshi-nyūdō is a Japanese festival monster. It protects festivalgoers and brings luck. Mikoshi-nyūdō emphasizes Japanese tradition and community.
  • Mekurabe—Mekurabe is a twin-headed demon. It brings luck to twin parents. Mekurabe reminds us to value individuality and Japanese culture’s diversity.
  • Hō-ō— Hō-ō is a fire-demon phoenix. It symbolizes rebirth from the ashes. Hō-ō emphasizes perseverance and resilience in challenging situations.
  • Yatagarasu—The three-legged crow demon Yatagarasu guides. It guides lost people. Yatagarasu reminds us to ask for help in life.
  • Hikeshibaba— a broom-wielding old woman demon, purifies. It removes bad luck and negativity. Hikeshibaba reminds us to release negativity and embrace positivity.
  • Katawaguruma—Katawaguruma is a spinning wheel demon. Spinners are supposed to get lucky. Katawaguruma reminds us that Japanese society values craftsmanship and art.
  • Akurojin-no-hi
  • Ryuu
  • Sunakake-baba
  • Shuten-doji
  • Kamikiri
  • Momonjii
  • Hoji
  • Abumi-guchi
  • Anmo
  • Kangiten
  • Zorigami
  • Amanojaku
  • Ushi-onna
  • Onibi
  • Harionago
  • Keukegen
  • Danzaburou-danuki
  • Kitsune
  • Amabie
  • Zennyo Ryūō
  • Yamabiko
  • Amemasu
  • Nue
  • Menreiki
  • Yosuzume
  • Akashita
  • Hotoke
  • Gaki
  • Sunekosuri
  • Datsue-ba
  • Genbu
  • Hyakki Yakō
  • Bakezōri
  • Amazake-babaa
  • Daidarabotchi
  • Uwan
  • Yamata no Orochi
  • Dodomeki
  • Chōchinbi
  • Obariyon

Kijimuna

Cute Japanese Demon Names

Japanese mythology is famous for its various creatures and spirits, including demon-like beings. Japanese mythology’s evil creatures range from the frightening Oni to the mischievous yokai. Japanese demon names are poetic and expressive, revealing their unique features. We present some of the cutest Japanese demon names in this blog to whet your interest in these interesting animals.

  • Ibaraki-Doji, a demon of deception, appears as a grotesque woman. It deceives people for its own benefit. Ibaraki-doji reminds us to watch out for manipulative people.
  • Gozu and Mezu—judgment demons—are bull and horse-headed. They evaluate deceased souls and decide their fate. Gozu and Mezu remind us that our actions have lasting effects.
  • Ichiren-bozu—A bald monk demon linked with Buddhism. Buddhist chanting brings luck. Ichiren-bozu emphasizes Japanese spirituality and inner tranquility.
  • Shōkera—A little ghostly demon connected with sickness, Shōkera is often represented. Its contact can cause disease. Shōkera emphasizes self-care and health.
  • Kodama—Kodama is a little, human-like tree demon. It inhabits trees and protects forests. Kodama reminds Japanese people to respect nature and the environment.
  • Umibōzu—a gigantic, dark ocean demon. It supposedly sinks boats and drowns sailors who offend the sea. Umibōzu reminds us of the ocean’s destructive force and the need to respect its borders.
  • Ashinagatenaga—Ashinagatenaga is a demon connected with collaboration and is represented as two monsters with long legs and arms. They must cooperate to succeed. Ashinagatenaga emphasizes Japanese teamwork and collaboration.
  • Akamanto—Akamanto is a public restroom demon represented as a red-capped man. It haunts public bathrooms and attacks unruly users. Akamanto emphasizes public courtesy.
  • Yama-inu—A mountain demon represented as a mountain dog. It protects mountains and warns hikers of danger. Yama-inu reminds hikers to respect nature, the mountains, and potential perils.
  • Yurei—Yurei is a ghostly death demon. It is believed to be a vengeful spirit from a traumatic death. Yurei reminds Japanese people to value life and death.
  • Sansei—An old guy with a cane, Sansei is a money demon. Respecting it brings luck and wealth. Sansei emphasizes hard work and respecting riches.
  • Kakurezato—A monster linked with hidden villages and a group of secretive individuals. They are hiding from society for a reason. Kakurezato reminds Japanese people to respect and embrace their many traditions.
  • Chōchinobake—A floating lantern with one eye and a lengthy tongue, Chōchinobake is a lantern demon. It appears and makes spooky noises at night to frighten people. Chōchinobake reminds us to overcome our worries.
  • Mononoke—Mononoke is a disease-related monster that possessed individuals. It’s supposed to trigger incurable diseases. Mononoke emphasizes self-care and medical treatment.
  • Onryō—Onryō is a demon of revenge and the spirit of a person who died with deep grudges. It’s said to avenge life’s wrongs. Onryō emphasizes forgiveness and peaceful dispute resolution.
  • Buruburu—A shivering monster linked with terror. It is claimed to scare people by giving them goosebumps. Buruburu reminds us to face our anxieties and take charge.
  • Onmyōji—A spiritualist demon with extraordinary powers to govern spirits. It leads to a peaceful afterlife. Onmyōji emphasizes spirituality and appreciating other religions.
  • Nuppeppo—The lazy demon Nuppeppo is generally represented as a fleshy lump. Lazy, unmotivated individuals see it. Nuppeppo reminds us to act and be proactive.
  • Shichinin Misaki—A ghost-related demon represented as seven ghostly figures. It haunts gravediggers. Shichinin Misaki reminds us to honor the deceased and their graves.
  • Otoroshi—A gatekeeper demon with razor-sharp claws. It protects sacred locations from unworthy visitors. Otoroshi emphasizes appreciation for sacred locations.
  • Zunbera-bō
  • Suiko
  • Futakuchi-onna
  • Ōkaburo
  • Gagoze
  • Furu-utsubo
  • Oni
  • Kiyohime
  • Guhin
  • Dōsojin
  • Kuzuryū
  • Mōryō
  • Ten
  • Heikegani
  • Shibaemon-tanuki
  • Shiryō
  • Sesshō-seki
  • Koromodako
  • Konaki-jiji
  • Raijin
  • Nogitsune
  • Obake
  • Akubōzu
  • Oiwa
  • Ikuchi
  • Ayakashi
  • Abura-sumashi
  • Nurarihyon
  • Misaki
  • Betobeto-san
  • Ushirogami
  • Hōsōshi
  • Shikigami
  • Akugyo
  • Tesso
  • Shikome
  • Ōnyūdō
  • Hakuja no Myojin
  • Fūjin
  • Koropokkuru
  • Jishin-namazu
  • Teke Teke
  • Tōfu-kozō

ALso Read:

Final Words:

Japanese demon names are a rich and fascinating aspect of Japanese culture that have captivated the imaginations of people around the world. From the vengeful Nyūnaisuzume to the seductive Taka-onna, each demon embodies a particular aspect of Japanese mythology and culture. By exploring these demons and their stories, we gain a deeper understanding of the rich symbolism and history of Japan. So the next time you hear a Japanese demon name, remember that it is much more than just a creature of horror, but rather a complex and intricate part of a proud and storied tradition.

Arun Verma

Hi, myself Arun Verma. I Love Playing Multiplayer Games, Exploring new Technologies, Buying Cool Gadgets, and Deeply Research Names. Working at Deloitte gave me the knowledge to blog about Business Ideas I have to deal with on a regular basis. ChampW is my dream project subjected to sharing knowledge on topics I have expertise in. I am committed to providing only quality values to help lovely readers like you. Thanks for being here and I'd love to get to know you more. Leave a comment and say Hi!

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